Wendy the Hut

Wendy the Hut was bought at a farm sale in the late 1960's, by Wendy's (the last owners) farmer husband.  She thinks this sale may possibly have been at Fulmodeston, Norfolk, on Lord Hastings farm.

Wendy and Chief Hut Helper Scott Bunting, pose with Wendy the Hut prior to Hut Rescue No. 4 at Brampton ...

I first saw Wendy the Hut two years ago when my neighbour came across her when out walking.  He told me of her whereabouts so when I was over that way I looked her up and was lucky to find the owner at home.  I left my telephone number with her and when she had to move house recently she contacted me and asked whether I would like to look after her hut.

Wendy the Hut was not used by them as a Shepherds Hut but was purchased purely because he liked her and wanted to save her.  When they gave up the farm she moved into the garden site in 1979 which is where we rescued her.

Wendy's children sometimes used to sleep in her on summer nights.  That must have been fun as the only bolt to hold the door shut at that time was on the outside.  However, she has a pop hole beside the rear door for the sheep dog to get in and out so that could well have been used in an emergency!

Wendy the Hut is very rotten around one side as the roof tin overhang is very short.  Plus she was on the lean to one side so the hut sides have stayed wet and exacerbated the rot.  A major lesson in Hutting is to build a hut with a big roof overhang all around, or even to fit a gutter system as this will ensure they last forever!  Much of the rot I see is caused by timber getting wet caused by roofs that are too short.  If they were to be extended 4" all round that can make the difference between a Hut surviving or falling foul of the rot!  Wind driven rain on the sides is minimal compared to all the water a roof area can collect, which is then run down the sides every time even a small rain shower occurs.

The door end prior to moving ...

Thanks to some grease remaining, Wendy's back wheels still turned and we managed to remove them on the move day which made loading alot easier.  As with most huts, the front pair on the turntable are rusted tight and will need the heat treatment to free off.

Both the back wheels have been tyred in steel over cast rims as a repair, with steel spokes in cast iron hubs ...

Scott gets to grips with an Elder bush ... 

As a concession to the late 20th Century, a small steam driven chainsaw was used to do the hard work on the last bit of Elder root.  This had taken a grip around the turntable frame but soon let go once it acknowledged defeat was inevitable ...

The Elder stump finally lets go of the Hut ... 

Jacking up Wendy the Hut to fit under the trolley to load onto the trailer ...

Wendy the Hut perches on her trolley frame and is ready to winch up the ramps ... 

Halfway there ... 

Loaded and ready to go ...and still time for refreshments!  Total food intake for Hut Rescue No. 4 ...2 x Peanut Butter Sarnies, 1 x Penguin Biscuit (a green one), 1 x Banana (ripe) and 2 x Coffee's (thermos flavour).   

We managed the Hut move in one day before dark and even returned the trailer to the owner before bewitching hour.  My poor Series 1 Land Rover really struggled with the load as I had fitted bigger tyres which raised the gearing.  Luckily we didn't have to travel far as we couldn't get over 30 mph on the way home!  Another lesson learned and any more Hut moving will see my smaller tyres refitted.

A big "thank you" to Scott yet again for his help on Hut Rescue No. 4. and I could not have done it without him ....or his hat!  He had said that Hut Rescue No. 3 (Cristina of Kirtling) would be the last but I managed to persuade him to help again.

Scott and his special Hutting Hat with mystical hut moving powers ...

Scott demonstrates the relative dimensions of Wendy the Hut.  Scott is not 9ft tall with an 8ft wingspan ... 

Wendy the Hut is now tucked away safely with Harry the Hut ...a match made in Hut Heaven?!